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Dünhaupt, PHerr, H (2020). Trade, Global Value Chains and Development – What Role for National Development Banks?. Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung, 89(3), 9-33. https://doi.org/10.3790/vjh.89.3.9
Dünhaupt, Petra Herr, HansjörgDünhaupt, Petra Herr, Hansjörg (2020). "Trade, Global Value Chains and Development – What Role for National Development Banks?" Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung, vol. 89no. 3, 2020 pp. 9-33. https://doi.org/10.3790/vjh.89.3.9
Dünhaupt, PHerr, H (2020). Trade, Global Value Chains and Development – What Role for National Development Banks?. Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Vol. 89 (Issue 3), pp 9-33. https://doi.org/10.3790/vjh.89.3.9

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Trade, Global Value Chains and Development – What Role for National Development Banks?

Dünhaupt, Petra | Herr, Hansjörg

Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Vol. 89 (2020), Iss. 3 : pp. 9–33

2 Citations (CrossRef)

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Petra Dünhaupt, Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht (HWR) Berlin

  • Petra Dünhaupt, is a research associate at the Berlin School of Economics and Law in Germany. She works on issues of global value chains, development economics, financialization and income distribution. Most recently, she participated in the international and interdisciplinary research project “Global Value Chains – Economic and Social Upgrading” at the HWR Berlin, and the regional project “Core Labour Standards Plus (CLS+)”, initiated by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation Singapore. Petra Dünhaupt holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Oldenburg and a M.A. in International and Development Economics from the HTW Berlin.
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Hansjörg Herr, Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht (HWR) Berlin

  • Hansjörg Herr is a professor (retired) for Supranational Integration at the Berlin School of Economics and Law in Germany. He is an expert on the development of the international monetary system, European monetary integration, labour markets and development economics.
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Cited By

  1. Economic and Social Upgrading in Global Value Chains

    Global Value Chains—A Panacea for Development?

    Dünhaupt, Petra | Herr, Hansjörg

    2022

    https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-87320-2_3 [Citations: 0]
  2. Economic and Social Upgrading in Global Value Chains

    Comparing National and Industry-Specific Trajectories of Economic and Social Upgrading as Well as Various Strategic Solutions

    Dünhaupt, Petra | Herr, Hansjörg | Mehl, Fabian | Teipen, Christina

    2022

    https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-87320-2_20 [Citations: 0]

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Abstract

Summary: In this article we discuss the need for industrial policy and role of development banks for economic development. The catching-up of countries in the Global South to productivity levels and living standards of the Global North is the exception. There are two main economic explanations for this observation. First, developing countries are pushed to low-tech and labor-intensive productions and tasks in global value chains. This offers the advantage of easier industrialisation, but it does not automatically lead to productivity levels comparable with the Global North. Foreign direct investments only partially help to overcome this problem. Second, low trust in national currencies in the Global South leads to distorted financial markets which do not provide sufficient credit for investment. National development banks play a key role in facilitating the economic catching-up of the Global South as part of needed industrial policies. They can alleviate distortions in the financial system and at the same time support the transformation of the economy towards higher productivity and ecological transformation. We explain development bank policies by using the KfW as an example of an effective industrial policy.