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Kümin, B (2014). Kirchgenossen an der Macht. Vormoderne politische Kultur in den “Pfarreirepubliken“ von Gersau und Dithmarschen. Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung, 41(2), 187-230. https://doi.org/10.3790/zhf.41.2.187
Kümin, Beat (2014). "Kirchgenossen an der Macht. Vormoderne politische Kultur in den “Pfarreirepubliken“ von Gersau und Dithmarschen" Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung, vol. 41no. 2, 2014 pp. 187-230. https://doi.org/10.3790/zhf.41.2.187
Kümin, B (2014). Kirchgenossen an der Macht. Vormoderne politische Kultur in den “Pfarreirepubliken“ von Gersau und Dithmarschen. Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung, Vol. 41 (Issue 2), pp 187-230. https://doi.org/10.3790/zhf.41.2.187

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Kirchgenossen an der Macht. Vormoderne politische Kultur in den “Pfarreirepubliken“ von Gersau und Dithmarschen

Kümin, Beat

Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung, Vol. 41 (2014), Iss. 2 : pp. 187–230

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Prof. Dr. Beat Kümin, Department of History, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom

Cited By

  1. Catholicism Decentralized: Local Religion in the Early Modern Periphery

    Kümin, Beat

    Tramontana, Felicita

    Church History, Vol. 89 (2020), Iss. 2 P.268

    https://doi.org/10.1017/S0009640720001298 [Citations: 0]

Abstract

Parishioners in Power. Premodern Political Culture in the “Parish Republics“ of Gersau and Dithmarschen

This essay examines the political culture of highly autonomous rural communes in the Holy Roman Empire. Given the ecclesiastical roots of collective organization, the Swiss village of Gersau and the land of Dithmarschen in present-day Schleswig-Holstein are interpreted as two types of “parish republics“. Following contextual and methodological remarks, the argument draws on a range of sources to assess constitutional principles, political practices, self-reflection and external perceptions. In contrast to the general trend of centralization and confessionalization, the two parish republics ran their own religious and secular affairs over several centuries, embarking on independent diplomatic and military missions along the way. Internally, political regimes were characterized by broad participation and the location of sovereignty at the communal base, even though certain families acquired particular prominence. Domestic chronicles allow insights into communal identities, the awareness of collective freedom and sometimes fierce conflicts. External observations reveal a complex mixture of curiosity, respect and disapproval. Overall, Gersau and Dithmarschen illustrate the existence of alternative political trajectories and the significance of rural republicanism in the premodern period.