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Headey, B., Muffels, R., Wooden, M. Money and Happiness: The Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption. Journal of Contextual Economics – Schmollers Jahrbuch, 125(1), 131-144. https://doi.org/10.3790/schm.125.1.131
Headey, Bruce; Muffels, Ruud and Wooden, Mark "Money and Happiness: The Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption" Journal of Contextual Economics – Schmollers Jahrbuch 125.1, 2005, 131-144. https://doi.org/10.3790/schm.125.1.131
Headey, Bruce/Muffels, Ruud/Wooden, Mark (2005): Money and Happiness: The Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption, in: Journal of Contextual Economics – Schmollers Jahrbuch, vol. 125, iss. 1, 131-144, [online] https://doi.org/10.3790/schm.125.1.131

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Money and Happiness: The Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption

Headey, Bruce | Muffels, Ruud | Wooden, Mark

Journal of Contextual Economics – Schmollers Jahrbuch, Vol. 125 (2005), Iss. 1 : pp. 131–144

2 Citations (CrossRef)

Additional Information

Article Details

Headey, Bruce

Muffels, Ruud

Wooden, Mark

Cited By

  1. Financial Satisfaction in Old Age: A Satisfaction Paradox or a Result of Accumulated Wealth?

    Hansen, Thomas | Slagsvold, Britt | Moum, Torbjørn

    Social Indicators Research, Vol. 89 (2008), Iss. 2 P.323

    https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-007-9234-z [Citations: 102]
  2. The Relation Between Life Satisfaction and the Material Situation: A Re-Evaluation Using Alternative Measures

    Christoph, Bernhard

    Social Indicators Research, Vol. 98 (2010), Iss. 3 P.475

    https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-009-9552-4 [Citations: 47]

Abstract

The paper uses household economic panel data from five countries - Australia, Britain, Germany, Hungary and The Netherlands - to provide a reconsideration of the impact of economic well-being on happiness. The main conclusion is that happiness is considerably more affected by economic circumstances than previously believed. In all five countries wealth affects life satisfaction more than income. In the countries for which consumption data are available (Britain and Hungary), non-durable consumption expenditures also prove at least as important to happiness as income.