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Afterword: Anthropology, Climate Change and Social-Ecological Transformations in the Anthropocene

Bollig, Michael

Sociologus, Vol. 68 (2018), Iss. 1: pp. 85–94

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Bollig, Michael, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Universität zu Köln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, D-50923 Köln, Germany

References

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